Examples of how it works will appear here:

Evaluation out June 14th 2018 tells us 96% of Australian Alumni leave as better leaders!

In addition over 92% leave more agile, understanding emotional intelligence better, eating healthier, with growth mindsets and improved mental health and human potential.

It works.

72 participants have been part of Kitchen Challenge Australia since Feb 2017. 68 completed and 4 non complete due to social circumstances.

36 members from communities that face challenges have participated in 6 challenges over 16 month period Jan17 to Mar 18

98% of participants have recorded improvements in their mental health and well being.

Feb 2018 Winner…LGPro Award for Diversity and Inclusion for Brimbank City council shows doing something different in collaboration brings success.

Channel 4 UK Celebrating its Year of Disability 2016 stated the following about the impact of its show based on Kitchen Challenge:

“As a result of the programme, six out of the eight cast members – all of whom had previously been unable to find work in the restaurant industry – were offered a paid job in catering or hospitality. Five of them continue to work there six months later, while the sixth decided go back to college for further catering training.

74% of viewers felt that they were shown a view of disability that they had never seen before on TV whilst 68% agreed that the programme positively changed their perceptions of those with a disability. Kitchen Impossible also inspired change among disabled viewers that are currently not working, with eight in ten stating that the programme had given them the confidence to apply for jobs or had inspired them to consider a new path of employment.

Finally, 70% of viewers in a position to employ someone stated that the programme positively changed their perceptions of those with a disability, while 83% said it made them think about the challenges facing those with a disability in a different way. ”

Check out our You Tube Channel and the Kitchen Challenge Playlist

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3JXvIENQVx7iNHjn6jm9Bw

Extract from COGS Report 2011 into Social Prescribing using Kitchen Challenge – including a number of case studies

The Kitchen Challenge programme was run twice as a commissioned community opportunity for two purposively sampled groups of individuals. The programme aims for individuals to achieve a number of objectives relating to mental health and wellbeing, which fall in within the remit of social prescription.

All Most Some
Improved attitude and positive motivation

Problem-solving

Ability to break problem into smaller parts

Identify key issues

Identify possible solutions

Apply knowledge to work to a solution

Ability to use initiative and self motivation

Team working to accomplish goal/task

Improvement in self perception and worthiness Sense of happiness, achievement, positive outlook to life

Improved mental health and

wellbeing

Movement towards employment and empowerment

Improved independence

Develop long-term aspirations and short-term goals Reduction in psychological distress

Adaptable – change in direction dependent upon situation Improvement in self-esteem and confidence

Demonstrate strong personal drive

Being considerate of others and value of diversity

Take on board other’s feelings and express own in unemotional fashion to achieve win-win outcome

Ability to tackle/face challenges with improved self-confidence and accomplish in a better way

Reduction in dependency and improved independence

Ability to challenge self

Consideration of the ‘larger things in life’

To be able to put self forward/ volunteer for tasks and make suggestions

Breakdown barriers of unfamiliarity and sense of alienation

 

Warwick Edinburgh Mental Health and Well Being Scale

Evidence from the commissioned Kitchen Challenge programme, illustrates a positive movement towards improved mental health and well being. In addition to discussion, individuals provided feedback through self-reporting using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Health and Well Being Scale (WEMWBS).

Case Studies

An open letter from the amazing Debs ( Kitchen Challenge Participant):

debs

Hi to everyone that is thinking about doing the Kitchen challenge or who are already doing it. My name is Debra, but everyone calls me Debs, I would like to tell you what Kitchen Challenge did for me. First I will tell you a little bit about my past.

My childhood was ok, but in my teenage years a lot of bad things happened to me, one was being bullied. I didn’t get the help that I needed and I carried these traumas around with me. I started to drink as it gave me confidence, so I thought at the time. The drinking gradually got worse as time went by. I went through a rocky marriage and two really bad relationships, the only good thing that came out of all that were my 3 children.

My drinking escalated in my late 30’s, I then started to take drugs. To cut a very long story short, I ended up losing everything and became homeless living on the streets. After a year and a half living rough, I decided to seek help, ended up in and out of detox 4 times, finally I hit my rock bottom and managed to get into Rehab and there I received the right help which I was longing for.

I decided not to go back to London and decided to stay in Cheltenham and concentrate on getting back on feet and to rebuild the relationships I had lost with my children. Before all of this happened to me, I worked in the catering business and always wanted to do an NVQ in catering.

After rehab I went into a dry house, were there are rules in place, I needed this as I had to get a structure in place for me to move forward. Whilst in the dry house, my project worker told about the Kitchen Challenge and would I be interested in going on the course as she knew how desperate I was to get back into catering. I jumped at the chance, the course was amazing, built up my confidence, help me communicate with others and work as a team, I found out I had skills which I didn’t know I had, really gave me that boost I needed. The course really changed my outlook on life for the better and I’ve never looked back, I can’t thank Rob Rees enough for this opportunity. I went on and did level 3 in professional cookery and worked full time at the Star Bistro. I also had a couple of friends on the same course who choice different careers paths and are doing extremely well, this course benefits everyone, whether you want to be a mechanic or work in a shop.

I wish everyone the best of luck for the future

Debs x

Stuart, late 50s

Stuart is in his late fifties, who lost a limb in a motorcycle accident 25 years previously. Stuart has since suffered from depression and poor mental health. He has often managed his emotional issues by cutting himself off from the outside world. Stuart has become obese and has lost self-confidence. Stuart was referred to the 6 week ‘Kitchen Challenge’ programme.

Participating in Kitchen Challenge enabled Stuart to identify his skills and strengths and recognise his potential. This led to an increased feeling of self worth and confidence, which contributed to a sense of improved wellbeing.

He felt better able to job search and has lost weight, he is more outgoing and self confidence.

John, late 20s

John is a man in his late twenties who has been receiving support from Job Centre Plus and claiming employment and support allowance (ELA) for people who have a limited capability for work because of a health condition or disability. John has moderate learning difficulties, but has previously had employment. John was a quiet and shy person who preferred watch and listen, rather than be involved. John lived at home with his parents. John was referred to the 6 week ‘Kitchen Challenge’ programme.

Participating in Kitchen Challenge enabled John was able to step forward and take on roles he would not normally be comfortable with, such as Head Chef. This helped John to build his self-confidence and esteem, and push his own personal boundaries to recognise his potential to identify his skills and strengths, to recognise his potential. This led to John becoming the nominated leader of the group and a feeling an increase in self worth. John felt better able to manage environments and situations he would not normally feel comfort within, and more confident to find employment. John has been motivated to apply for a number of different roles during and after the programme, and has been supported by his Support Worker. John has been offered a position with a new food charity initiative on a part-time basis, and it has been suggested that a volunteering period in the run up would be beneficial for John.

Peter, late 20s

Peter is a man in his late twenties who has been receiving support from Job Centre Plus and claiming employment and support allowance (ELA) for people who have a limited capability for work because of a health condition or disability. He was “disconnected” from society, unable to make eye contact, unkempt and disheveled, and did not eat properly as he did not have an oven. Peter was referred to the 6 week ‘Kitchen Challenge’ programme.

Participating in Kitchen Challenge enabled Peter to identify his skills and strengths, to recognise his potential. This led to Peter feeling an increase in self worth and confidence to a sense of improved wellbeing. He felt better able to engage in with Job Centre Plus to find employment, and has taken on a job as a car valeter, 18 hours a week. Peter takes pride in his appearance and is bright eyed and clean-shaven. He has also given up smoking, and has been cigarette free for over two months. Peter has also brought an oven, which has allowed him to eat better.

Joan, late 40.s

Joan was referred to Kitchen Challenge by her GP with the aim of improving her wellbeing. Joan has a complex history of mental health problems, which are exacerbated by a multitude of social problems and long term alcohol dependency. This had resulted in her having very low self confidence and being unable to face social situations.

Joan frequently feels stuck due to her complex social situation and her inability to plan and take decisions.

Following comprehensive assessment it became clear that Joan would not yet be able to engage with the demands of a Kitchen Challenge. However, in discussion with Joan it was agreed that a longer term approach to providing support would be of benefit to her. This COGs style support has helped her with practicing strategies to allow her to explore a more independent lifestyle. She frequently voices a desire to find a flat in a nearby town and is being assisted in dealing with her anxieties to allow her to begin to think more clearly about planning for her future.